Monogamy? Now?

var gaJsHost = ((“https:” == document.location.protocol) ? “https://ssl.” : “http://www.”);document.write(unescape(“%3Cscript src='” + gaJsHost + “google-analytics.com/ga.js’ type=’text/javascript’%3E%3C/script%3E”)); var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker(“UA-xxxxxx-x”);pageTracker._trackPageview();
Generally speaking, I’m not monogamous in my knitting. When it comes to patterns and yarn I just haven’t been able to commit to one project until completion in a long time.

If we’re making a quick run into Tulsa – usually one project is in my knitting bag. But the instant it becomes an overnight trip the bag is loaded up with two, three, or maybe even four projects. Most of these are likely to be already on the needles and in various stages.

One project is the mindless type — for which I’ve already memorized the lace pattern or maybe a simple sock that needs no thought. These are great for times when I’m expected to carry on a conversation or there’s a lot of environmental distraction and I may need to put the project down from time to time. This project is great for a knitting night with friends or when wine or beer is consumed.

Also in the bag is a slightly more challenging project — or two — that requires the pattern to be handy. With these projects I can still listen or manage to answer questions. Usually the stitches are readable and I can keep track of where I am even if I have to stop in the middle of a row. Sure I prefer to finish a row before I have to put a project down but that’s not always an option. This type of project is the bulk of my knitting life.

There is often an extra already wound ball of yarn, with a pattern, and the appropriate sized needle in the bag. This I consider Emergency Knitting. You just never know when you’ll be stuck somewhere and finish what is already on the needles. Or maybe you’ll get bored – or drop fifteen stitches and need concentration to surgically repair the project before continuing.

At home there may be a project that doesn’t travel. It’s either a new design or seriously intense lace knitting. 

I wonder sometimes when I heft my knitting bag onto my shoulder and walk out the door if I’m more than a little obsessed with having enough projects with me. When I’m carrying around three or four projects in-progress, what is the likelihood that I’ll finish anything anytime soon?

This past weekend I finally finished my Cloisters Wrap. This lovely shawl was the first new project I cast on in January of 2011. Last month when I thought (laughing is allowed) that I’d join my friend Kat’s challenge of Frog or Finish or as she called it S*%$ or Get Off the Pot I pulled out this half complete shawl and was determined to finish it. There were some slight distractions along the way but here I am six weeks later with a finished project.

As  you know I’ve been dithering for weeks over which yarn to use for my Magpie Shawl. It’s a gorgeous pattern and I want the yarn to be just right. I’ve actually cast on twice and decided the yarn wasn’t the right thing. So Magpie is on the back burner for now until the perfect yarn calls to me.

Currently in my knitting bag are two projects and one book. One project on the needles and one not yet cast on (Emergency Knitting). In progress is Bridgewater by Jared Flood of Brooklyn Tweed fame. The first time I saw this project on Ravelry I queued it and bought the pattern. I was that smitten.

The body is a HUGE garter stitch square knit from corner to corner – beginning and ending with one stitch. Garter stitch for days. Weeks likely. Mindless and hypnotic garter stitch.

Then stitches are picked up along the four sides to create the knitted on lace. This is the part that blew my mind. I’ve done minor amounts of picking up stitches, but not a full-on-hard-core-pick-up-and-knit project like Bridgewater. The sweet thing that I keep telling myself is that when you pick up along four sides – you’re knitting in the round – and not the purl-across-the-wrong-side-game. Surely that means it’ll go faster right? Purling stitches require more time than knitting stitches. Now, to be honest, most of my lace projects are in the 400-800 yard range. Bridgewater calls for 1500-1800 yards. That’s a lot of yarn!

Initially I planned to knit Bridgewater using the light silver/gray of the Hearth colorway in Oak Barn Merino. It’s the perfect weight for the pattern and there were so many lovely gray finished Bridgewaters in Ravelry. But – my skein was a little shy of my comfort zone at 1440 yards. After querying several people who’d finished the shawl I decided to dye two skeins of new yarn. I looked at all of the finished shawls on hand and gave some heavy thought to what color I didn’t have but would likely wear. This thought resulted in a new colorway for Oak Barn – Red Earth. A rich deep burgundy with red and brown undertones.

I’m very happy with how Bridgewater is coming along. There are over a hundred stitches on the needle (this after starting with just one). Sure it’s all garter stitch but I feel no pressing urge to cast on another pattern. This is a pretty weird mindset for me. I’ve had a few strange flashbacks in the past two days. I remember the days when I first began lace knitting and was completely monogamous. Admittedly this was before Ravelry, and before the barrage of stunning shawls that I see whenever I check the 11shawls2011 forum.

So I’m asking myself – will I be monogamous with this project? If so, why this project? 

Part of the answer to the second question may be timing. In just over a week we’ll be taking off for a few days on a road trip to New Orleans. One big project for car knitting sounds pretty serene to me right now. I have no expectations that I’ll finish the project on the trip. I want to enjoy The Crescent City, the sights, the smells, the music, the food – my friend Jessica and her husband Chaz, and Chris’s friend Elliott with whom we’ll be staying. Jessica has shared all sorts of fabulous suggestions for restaurants, museums, music venues, and even yarn shops. We’ll be in NOLA for Voodoo Fest and Halloween. It’s going to be fun…

While downloading a few quick snapshots of Cloisters blocking I discovered an additional photo taken at a recent show that I think you’ll enjoy. This lovely dragonfly landed on a finished shawl.
I was quite charmed by its presence.

Advertisements

Kansas City Plaza Art Fair Recap!

var gaJsHost = ((“https:” == document.location.protocol) ? “https://ssl.” : “http://www.”);document.write(unescape(“%3Cscript src='” + gaJsHost + “google-analytics.com/ga.js’ type=’text/javascript’%3E%3C/script%3E”)); var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker(“UA-xxxxxx-x”);pageTracker._trackPageview();
The Kansas City Plaza Art Fair was incredible. The crowds are mind-boggling, I recall reading somewhere that the expected number of attendees were 300,000. I don’t know if I’m correct on that number but it felt like that many people once the sun went down on Friday and Saturday evening.

People visiting our booth, knitters/crocheters and those just drawn by the color, were definitely appreciative and very happy to see an indie dyer included in the fiber artist category. I felt quite honored to be part of this show.

Below are an assortment of photos from the weekend in Kansas City, and several of a new finished project that was on display. There was a second new finished project which I’ll post photos of in a day or so.

Click on the photos to enlarge them for a better view.

The new colorways of Lost City Silk yarns were a popular attraction!

This is a new modification on the Hindwing of the Monarch Shawl.
Notice how much lacier the lower section is. Details and an updated pattern to come soon.
Edited to add: The new modification to the Hindwing of the Monarch Shawl is now available!
Download Monarch Shawl version 1.5! 

Close up of the Monarch mod and beading. 
The wall of yarn (after a few customers have shopped). 
These guys visited the booth and were kind enough to pose. Colorful fellas, not very chatty though. 
We were open until 10pm both Friday and Saturday night. 

Stage lighting was important to show off the lace designs after sundown.

What’s up next for LCK? We’ll be at the Art on Main in Jenks, Oklahoma on Saturday October 8th, then off to War Eagle Fair in Hindsville, Arkansas the weekend of October 13-16. More to come about the November and December schedule.

Kansas City Bound!

var gaJsHost = ((“https:” == document.location.protocol) ? “https://ssl.” : “http://www.”);document.write(unescape(“%3Cscript src='” + gaJsHost + “google-analytics.com/ga.js’ type=’text/javascript’%3E%3C/script%3E”)); var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker(“UA-xxxxxx-x”);pageTracker._trackPageview();
The Walnut Valley Festival was great fun and after just three days home we’re packed and ready to head out on the road again. This coming weekend Lost City Knits will be “representing” with hand dyed yarns and knitting at Kansas City’s 80th Annual Plaza Art Fair.

I’ve spent every day between the two shows in the studio dyeing, skeining and restocking. There will be new colorways in sock yarn and silk this weekend!

Leonids Night in Lost City Silk

Rumplestilskin in Lost City Silk

Alchemy in Lost City Silk
Rose’ in Lost City Silk
New colorways in Lost City Sock Yarn!

If you’re in the KC area, or know knitters who are, we hope you’ll come out Friday evening (5-10pm), Saturday (10am-10pm), and Sunday (10am-5pm) to “represent” knitting as well! See you there!

Arts Festival Oklahoma!

var gaJsHost = ((“https:” == document.location.protocol) ? “https://ssl.” : “http://www.”);document.write(unescape(“%3Cscript src='” + gaJsHost + “google-analytics.com/ga.js’ type=’text/javascript’%3E%3C/script%3E”)); var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker(“UA-xxxxxx-x”);pageTracker._trackPageview();
The Autumn festival season began this past weekend with a short trip down the turnpike to Oklahoma City for the three-day Arts Festival Oklahoma on the Oklahoma City Community College campus. This was our second year at AFO and we really hit it off this year with a new booth location and some mighty fine weather. While Saturday was hot, both Sunday and Monday the temperature remained in the eighties, and everyone was delighted the Sunday morning’s cool front signaled the end of an especially hot summer here.

This was our first trial for a new set up which we’ve jokingly dubbed The Wall of Yarn. The yarns on the wall are the wool/tussah silk from Oklahoma raised sheep. In fact, our friends Sue and Nanc, the sheep farmers, arrived early Saturday morning to see the full range of colors that their sheep turned out to be! I think they were happy. When we picked up the fleeces from Sue and Nanc they were all white – okay not really white but what passes for white sheep for who live on a real farm. Being able to hang the skeins grouped in color ranges makes it easy for the customer to say, “I like blue” then see – and fondle – plenty of yarns in her favorite color. On the tables there are llama and alpaca yarns in baskets, sock yarns on another hanging rack and merino yarns on their own display as well.

I don’t know why but there are still people who are completely unaware of the popularity of knitting. It’s exciting to explain that – no, knitting isn’t a dying art and no they don’t have to settle for the old yucky chunky itchy acrylic yarn sold in craft and hobby big box stores.

As for my Finish or Frog goal – well – I’ve already fallen off the wagon. During the drive to OKC I made plenty of headway on the Bryn Mawr Skirt and even knitted down to the toe of the first Burlesque sock during slow moments on Saturday at the festival. I was feeling so good that I cast on another project. Here is an almost complete Monarch Shawl in the Wool Tussah Silk colorway called Summer Plums. (I’ve upgraded this wool from Sport to Worsted after doing several more wraps-per-inch tests. When you see it in person, you’ll understand why!) Look at the fun color play in this yarn.

Monarch Shawl in Summer Plums colorway
Burlesque Sock

Upside down Bryn Mawr Skirt

Employing a book light for car knitting on the way back to the farm

As I said, this is almost complete, only two more rows on the Fringe Chart. I’d like to finish it tonight. I’d like to finish the toe of the Burlesque Sock tomorrow night. I definitely like to finish the Bryn Mawr Skirt this week as well. All three are possible – especially if I don’t sleep or eat.

Checking In

Sometimes the urge to escape is fierce. Other times it’s just middlin’. The serious fierce urge usually signals pain and time for withdrawal. The middlin’ variety is usually more like a check-in with what’s going on with myself and occasionally involves well — a birthday.

Earlier this week I took three days off and drove to a rustic cabin in the Ozarks for a little time with myself. I consider this time alone – away from responsibilities – a good way to re-evaluate the past year, or several years, and see if I’m on the right path with my life. It takes several hours on the road before all the voices of the inner critic fall silent. (You know the inner critic right? The voice that says, “what a bozo” to about everything.) Once that happens I find I can journal and think about the things in my life that have occurred and how I’ve dealt with them.

Socrates said “The unexamined life is not worth living.” Not that I’m some great philosopher, but I think if you never ask yourself the hard questions (am I doing what I’d like to be doing, am I happy, do I follow my own advice, do I respect myself and others, what changes can I make…) then you are just plodding along with someone else steering your life or maybe just standing still and not actively involved in your own life. I’m not sure which is worse, but neither are very good.

Svar gaJsHost = ((“https:” == document.location.protocol) ? “https://ssl.” : “http://www.”);document.write(unescape(“%3Cscript src='” + gaJsHost + “google-analytics.com/ga.js’ type=’text/javascript’%3E%3C/script%3E”)); var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker(“UA-xxxxxx-x”);pageTracker._trackPageview();
Being in a beautiful natural setting does wonders for the spirit. Of course, I am lucky enough to live on a beautiful farm, but if I’m home I’ll find this and that to do and only occasionally get quiet enough to check in without a sense of guilt over not taking care of the endless things that I should be working on instead of being in my head.

Svar gaJsHost = ((“https:” == document.location.protocol) ? “https://ssl.” : “http://www.”);document.write(unescape(“%3Cscript src='” + gaJsHost + “google-analytics.com/ga.js’ type=’text/javascript’%3E%3C/script%3E”)); var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker(“UA-xxxxxx-x”);pageTracker._trackPageview();
My only responsibility on this getaway trip was to feed myself. That’s pretty easy. Once I arrived the first order of business was to unload my car of groceries and personal items. I spread out all my “stuff” on the kitchen table. Journal, pen, snacks, food, colored pencils, books. The window beside the table opened onto a deck. From the deck I could see where the Buffalo River takes a turn and the mountains beyond. I made myself some hot tea and settled in.

Soon I got down to journaling. At some point I looked up over the rim of my reading glasses and out the window. The mountain looked like it was on fire! I panicked and rushed out onto the deck. It was the sun’s last light, not fire. The colors were spectacular — in the clouds, the sky and on the mountain. I decided it was too good to miss so I threw on a sweater and took a little walk.

The first night in the cabin was cold, much colder than I had anticipated – in fact – it got down to 30 degrees F (that’s -1C). All night I ran the cabin heater and snuggled under the quilt and a blanket. The next morning the fog over the river was incredibly thick. As I drank a second cup of coffee I watched as it slowly disipated.

Svar gaJsHost = ((“https:” == document.location.protocol) ? “https://ssl.” : “http://www.”);document.write(unescape(“%3Cscript src='” + gaJsHost + “google-analytics.com/ga.js’ type=’text/javascript’%3E%3C/script%3E”)); var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker(“UA-xxxxxx-x”);pageTracker._trackPageview();

Svar gaJsHost = ((“https:” == document.location.protocol) ? “https://ssl.” : “http://www.”);document.write(unescape(“%3Cscript src='” + gaJsHost + “google-analytics.com/ga.js’ type=’text/javascript’%3E%3C/script%3E”)); var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker(“UA-xxxxxx-x”);pageTracker._trackPageview();

Svar gaJsHost = ((“https:” == document.location.protocol) ? “https://ssl.” : “http://www.”);document.write(unescape(“%3Cscript src='” + gaJsHost + “google-analytics.com/ga.js’ type=’text/javascript’%3E%3C/script%3E”)); var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker(“UA-xxxxxx-x”);pageTracker._trackPageview();
Then I switched from jeans to shorts and pulled on a sweater over a tank top to go for a 3.5 mile hike. I took my camera, my journal and my sweet time on the hike. Just as with journaling, I looked for new growth, simple beauty, tranquility, abundance, slick spots, flights of fancy, and hazardous terrain.

Here are a few highlights – from the hike that is.

 Question Mark Butterfly

Zebra Swallowtail

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail

After spending over three hours out in the woods I tiredly made it back to my little cabin. Then I had a nap, read a little, did some knitting, more journaling and before long I discovered I was ready to head into the nearby town for dinner.

The second day had flown quickly. The third day dawned bright and sunny. I drove home to find a smiling man and four crazy dogs happy to see me. I think I’m ready for another year.



………….


eta: If you’re interested in butterflies and moths I heartily recommend you visit 

………….

Svar gaJsHost = ((“https:” == document.location.protocol) ? “https://ssl.” : “http://www.”);document.write(unescape(“%3Cscript src='” + gaJsHost + “google-analytics.com/ga.js’ type=’text/javascript’%3E%3C/script%3E”)); var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker(“UA-xxxxxx-x”);pageTracker._trackPageview();

Svar gaJsHost = ((“https:” == document.location.protocol) ? “https://ssl.” : “http://www.”);document.write(unescape(“%3Cscript src='” + gaJsHost + “google-analytics.com/ga.js’ type=’text/javascript’%3E%3C/script%3E”)); var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker(“UA-xxxxxx-x”);pageTracker._trackPageview();

Desert Southwest Vacation – Part Two

Desert Southwest Vacation Part Two

Taos and Santa Fe, New Mexico

Leaving the beautiful parks of Utah and making our way toward Taos on Utah Hwy 261 we took one of the most hair raising roads of the trip and probably my life (rivaled only by those skinny winding cliffside roads in Ireland). Sure there was warning sign that trucks need to detour, and then a sign that said a gravel road was ahead. That didn’t pause us, heck we live on a dirt and gravel road. But this road was different. The narrow gravel road twisted and switchbacked all the way down a mountain side. Chris was in his element and loving every moment. I was gripping the door handle and trying not to panic as I waited for the Meclizine to kick in. We met no other vehicles on this section, which was fortunate because one of us would have had to back up to one of the few (very few) places where a should had been created just wide enough for a tiny car to perch as another passed. It gives me the shudders to think about it now.

As we dropped off the mountain road onto the desert floor I was flooded with relief and there were several miles of weird laughing as we talked and drove along a now flat highway. Our next goal was to make it to Monument Valley before sunset. If you’ve seen many old school westerns you’ve seen glimpses of Monument Valley. We didn’t stop for photos but we did pass a movie being filmed.

This is Navajo land, barren and wide open. After dinner at a local diner in Kayenta, we filled the Volkswagen up with diesel and decided to drive on through the dark to find a hotel. Seventeen miles east of Kayenta on Hwy 417 a school bus we’d been following stopped. A tall lean young man stepped out and crossed the road. In our headlights we could see him cross through a gate and walk into a pitch black night. There were no house lights in the distance. The temperature was near freezing. I felt chilled inside my nice car with seatwarmers as I thought of the young man wallking….

The Leonids meteor shower was supposed to begin that night and as we drove on toward a hotel in Cortez we watched the blue black sky. We saw a few meteors dart through the sky and disappear quickly.

The next day as we drove through Carson National Park nearing Taos we had to slow down to navigate a road block – of sheep and goats. These photos were taken as I leaned out the window all the while being watched by the guardian of the flock.
DSCN1389

DSCN1391

DSCN1393

Our Taos B&B was the Stewart House. It’s an utterly charming little place with all the amenities and loads of Taos charisma. The owner is soft-spoken and non-intrusive. She makes a mighty fine pancake breakfast too!

DSCN1406

DSCN1407

DSCN1410

DSCN1411

DSCN1414

Taos is one of my favorite places and a great stop if you like to park your car and then walk the streets stopping in shops. One of the best meals of our trip was hot soup from a street vendor. This young man will not be noted on your restaurant guide or in your Lonely Planet book. He’s a fabulous chef who uses local organic ingredients. I had the tomato bisque with peanuts, topped with sesame and cilantro. Not only was my body warm inside but my taste buds were thrilled and satisfied. Chris had a noodle dish which was wonderful. I wanted to go back and order duck chili but knew I couldn’t eat another bite.

DSCN1396

One of the planned stops was Weaving Southwest.This is now my favorite yarn shop in Taos. (For those of you who haven’t been there in a while Taos Sunflower has closed.) There are huge looms being used by a local weaver, and long walls of hand dyed yarns organized by color. It made me giddy. I’ve been in a lot of yarn shops but this place is spectacular with color! Weaving Southwest is also the home of the Rio Grande Spinning Wheel. The owner/founder’s granddaughter gave us a demo on the big spinning wheel. It’s dramatically different than most of the modern spinning wheels that I’ve seen. Chris and I each took a whirl at the peddles and spindle. I had an ah-ha moment as everything that I’ve tried on a drop spindle suddenly worked. Drafting was a breeze on this wheel. And get this – I spun lace weight! RIght there after a few minutes time – lace weight! Go figure.

Later on Paseo du Pueblo I spotted an overgrown park. Or was it? I walked through the vacant lot which has become an unofficial little sanctuary. Here are a few photos.

DSCN1402

DSCN1399

DSCN1400

DSCN1397

DSCN1401

DSCN1403

If you’re going to Taos be sure to drive up to Arroyo Seco. It’s small and quaint and a place I think I could live. Have some ice cream at the Taos Cow or a Negro Modello at Abe’s Bar. You can’t go wrong in Seco. Slow down to the local’s pace and enjoy the peacefulness.

Santa Fe is about museums, galleries and shopping. Because I can’t learn enough about Georgia O’Keeffe the O’Keeffe Museum was one of our first stops. I am constantly intrigued by O’Keeffe’s paintings and by the photographs of her. Her years in New Mexico especially, dragging home bones – walking in the wild openness – hours spent just watching the colors in her surroundings….

The Folk Museum in Santa Fe is another great stop. Whether you’re interested in fiber arts, silver smithing, painting or poppets the exhibits in this museum will make you happy. There is a lot to see and the exhibits change regularly so I recommend going every time you get an opportunity.

Travel – wherever you go – whyever you go – can be inspiring and enlightening. It can cause you to look at your life or the world around you in a new way.

I journal on a regular basis and daily while traveling, but before we left Santa Fe we sat down in the coffee shop of a local bookstore and poured onto paper our thoughts, dreams, and plans for the future. Notes made separate from our journals – notes to pin up and remind us of what we want so we don’t lose that focus as we return to our daily lives here on the farm.
Desert Southwest Vacation Part TwoTaos and Santa Fe, New MexicoLeaving the beautiful parks of Utah and making our way toward Taos on Utah Hwy 261 we took one of the most hair raising roads of the trip and probably my life (rivaled only by those skinny winding cliffside roads in Ireland). Sure there was warning sign that trucks need to detour, and then a sign that said a gravel road was ahead. That didn’t pause us, heck we live on a dirt and gravel road. But this road was different. The narrow gravel road twisted and switchbacked all the way down a mountain side. Chris was in his element and loving every moment. I was gripping the door handle and trying not to panic as I waited for the Meclizine to kick in. We met no other vehicles on this section, which was fortunate because one of us would have had to back up to one of the few (very few) places where a should had been created just wide enough for a tiny car to perch as another passed. It gives me the shudders to think about it now. As we dropped off the mountain road onto the desert floor I was flooded with relief and there were several miles of weird laughing as we talked and drove along a now flat highway. Our next goal was to make it to Monument Valley before sunset. If you’ve seen many old school westerns you’ve seen glimpses of Monument Valley. We didn’t stop for photos but we did pass a movie being filmed. This is Navajo land, barren and wide open. After dinner at a local diner in Kayenta, we filled the Volkswagen up with diesel and decided to drive on through the dark to find a hotel. Seventeen miles east of Kayenta on Hwy 417 a school bus we’d been following stopped. A tall lean young man stepped out and crossed the road. In our headlights we could see him cross through a gate and walk into a pitch black night. There were no house lights in the distance. The temperature was near freezing. I felt chilled inside my nice car with seatwarmers as I thought of the young man wallking….The Leonids meteor shower was supposed to begin that night and as we drove on toward a hotel in Cortez we watched the blue black sky. We saw a few meteors dart through the sky and disappear quickly. The next day as we drove through Carson National Park nearing Taos we had to slow down to navigate a road block – of sheep and goats. These photos were taken as I leaned out the window all the while being watched by the guardian of the flock. Our Taos B&B was the Stewart House. It’s an utterly charming little place with all the amenities and loads of Taos charisma. The owner is soft-spoken and non-intrusive. She makes a mighty fine pancake breakfast too! Taos is one of my favorite places and a great stop if you like to park your car and then walk the streets stopping in shops. One of the best meals of our trip was hot soup from a street vendor. This young man will not be noted on your restaurant guide or in your Lonely Planet book. He’s a fabulous chef who uses local organic ingredients. I had the tomato bisque with peanuts, topped with sesame and cilantro. Not only was my body warm inside but my taste buds were thrilled and satisfied. Chris had a noodle dish which was wonderful. I wanted to go back and order duck chili but knew I couldn’t eat another bite. One of the planned stops was Weaving Southwest.This is now my favorite yarn shop in Taos. (For those of you who haven’t been there in a while Taos Sunflower has closed.) There are huge looms being used by a local weaver, and long walls of hand dyed yarns organized by color. It made me giddy. I’ve been in a lot of yarn shops but this place is spectacular with color! Weaving Southwest is also the home of the Rio Grande Spinning Wheel. The owner/founder’s granddaughter gave us a demo on the big spinning wheel. It’s dramatically different than most of the modern spinning wheels that I’ve seen. Chris and I each took a whirl at the peddles and spindle. I had an ah-ha moment as everything that I’ve tried on a drop spindle suddenly worked. Drafting was a breeze on this wheel. And get this – I spun lace weight! RIght there after a few minutes time – lace weight! Go figure. Later on Paseo du Pueblo I spotted an overgrown park. Or was it? I walked through the vacant lot which has become an unofficial little sanctuary. Here are a few photos. If you’re going to Taos be sure to drive up to Arroyo Seco. It’s small and quaint and a place I think I could live. Have some ice cream at the Taos Cow or a Negro Modello at Abe’s Bar. You can’t go wrong in Seco. Slow down to the local’s pace and enjoy the peacefulness. Santa Fe is about museums, galleries and shopping. Because I can’t learn enough about Georgia O’Keeffe the O’Keeffe Museum was one of our first stops. I am constantly intrigued by O’Keeffe’s paintings and by the photographs of her. Her years in New Mexico especially, dragging home bones – walking in the wild openness – hours spent just watching the colors in her surroundings….The Folk Museum in Santa Fe is another great stop. Whether you’re interested in fiber arts, silver smithing, painting or poppets the exhibits in this museum will make you happy. There is a lot to see and the exhibits change regularly so I recommend going every time you get an opportunity. Travel – wherever you go – whyever you go – can be inspiring and enlightening. It can cause you to look at your life or the world around you in a new way. I journal on a regular basis and daily while traveling, but before we left Santa Fe we sat down in the coffee shop of a local bookstore and poured onto paper our thoughts, dreams, and plans for the future. Notes made separate from our journals – notes to pin up and remind us of what we want so we don’t lose that focus as we return to our daily lives here on the farm. var gaJsHost = ((“https:” == document.location.protocol) ? “https://ssl.” : “http://www.”);document.write(unescape(“%3Cscript src='” + gaJsHost + “google-analytics.com/ga.js’ type=’text/javascript’%3E%3C/script%3E”)); var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker(“UA-xxxxxx-x”);pageTracker._trackPageview();

Trying for Perspective

The morning is glistening here on the farm as the sun shoots off the bits of ice and frost that covers limbs and grass. Numerous friends of mine are running 5K races in below freezing temperatures. Not me, once upon a time I did such things. Some are shopping and may have been for hours. Instead of doing either I’m staring out the window of the Rabbit Hole I call an office at the bird feeder that I repaired and filled with seed yesterday. The little feathered friends we share the farm with haven’t discovered it yet. Or maybe they’re wary of the foreign thing hanging from the tree. I wish I could coax them, remind them the feeder was on the same limb all last winter until it blew off in a spring storm and that the pickin’s are going to be slim now with winter approaching. It’s not just for my entertainment, or so I pretend.

Avar gaJsHost = ((“https:” == document.location.protocol) ? “https://ssl.” : “http://www.”);document.write(unescape(“%3Cscript src='” + gaJsHost + “google-analytics.com/ga.js’ type=’text/javascript’%3E%3C/script%3E”)); var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker(“UA-xxxxxx-x”);pageTracker._trackPageview();

Avar gaJsHost = ((“https:” == document.location.protocol) ? “https://ssl.” : “http://www.”);document.write(unescape(“%3Cscript src='” + gaJsHost + “google-analytics.com/ga.js’ type=’text/javascript’%3E%3C/script%3E”)); var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker(“UA-xxxxxx-x”);pageTracker._trackPageview();


Avar gaJsHost = ((“https:” == document.location.protocol) ? “https://ssl.” : “http://www.”);document.write(unescape(“%3Cscript src='” + gaJsHost + “google-analytics.com/ga.js’ type=’text/javascript’%3E%3C/script%3E”)); var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker(“UA-xxxxxx-x”);pageTracker._trackPageview();
Avar gaJsHost = ((“https:” == document.location.protocol) ? “https://ssl.” : “http://www.”);document.write(unescape(“%3Cscript src='” + gaJsHost + “google-analytics.com/ga.js’ type=’text/javascript’%3E%3C/script%3E”)); var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker(“UA-xxxxxx-x”);pageTracker._trackPageview();
………….
Avar gaJsHost = ((“https:” == document.location.protocol) ? “https://ssl.” : “http://www.”);document.write(unescape(“%3Cscript src='” + gaJsHost + “google-analytics.com/ga.js’ type=’text/javascript’%3E%3C/script%3E”)); var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker(“UA-xxxxxx-x”);pageTracker._trackPageview();