Aeolian Fever

Really – it must be a disease – an exotic fever. Elizabeth Freeman brought it in from the Mojave Desert and infected countless knitters across the globe. We should have seen it coming after the Laminaria incident of 2008.

Needless to say – I’ve caught it. Aeolian Fever.

My first Aeolian, which I dearly love, is on Row 40 of the Edging Chart. I’m doing the Shoulderette size. This shawl has been pure joy to knit. Freeman has this uncanny ability to keep the knitter not just interested but devoted to the project. Boredom never sets in because the charts change at a nice pace. I’m hoping to finish the Baked Clay Aeolian sometime on Sunday.

It’s been such fun I decided to knit a second, and probably a third. I’ve been debating for several weeks on which yarn to use next and it seems the blue silk won out when the silver lined clear beads arrived. The blue silk is from MadelineTosh yarns and the beaded swatch below shimmers like sunlight on a clear blue lake. It’s slippery and beading isn’t second nature to me so this project will be a stay-at-home knit and another will be for car knitting. It’s lovely though – who wouldn’t be charmed?

The berry red zephyr (with only the partial amount of beads purchased so far) will be the third Aeolian.

I’ve never wanted to knit a pattern this many times. But I’m in good company because knitters on Ravelry are cranking them out like crazy.

Surely the cure for this is to just let it run its course….

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Summer of Lace

It’s almost time for the new Season of Lace to begin, Summer of Lace.
I’m jazzed. At 2:30am I was awake playing with yarn down in the Rabbit Hole. The SoL KAL (knitalong) is for the Aeolian Shawl, another great design by Elizabeth Freeman. She of the Laminaria Shawl fame, designer extraordinaire. I was smitten with the Aeolian immediately.
I have a lovely skein of yarn the exact color of raspberries, dyed by my friend Kay Meadors. Kay rocks as a dyer, although she’s primarily known for her knitting and crochet books. Now all along I’ve thought the Berries yarn was what I was going to knit my Aeolian from. But nooooo. In the middle of the night I pulled out some of the other yarn that Kay has dyed. Months ago I handed off a big cone of natural cream colored lace alpaca yarn. I told her I’d split it with her if she’d dye a few skeins of it for me. The cream just wasn’t working for me.
Kay outdid herself on color with this cone of boring alpaca. The skeins she sent me are stunning and saturated with rich color. For now though, let me show you just how lovely one particular skein is. She’s called it Terra Cotta. And it will be my Aeolian Shawl.

Enjoy the beauty…doesn’t it take your breath away?



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Creek Hiking Shawl!

My Laminaria is off the wires and already had several outings. This week we took the shawl to the most appropriate place I could imagine for a shawl named for kelp – the creek that cuts through our farm. The photos below were taken directly below our house, which is perched on the bluff overlooking Clear Creek.

This project has been such an incredible experience for me. I was addicted to lace already but the Laminaria is by far the most challenging shawl I’ve completed. The design was constantly intriguing and the lace cashmere/alpaca yarn from Joy at The Knitting Goddess was a dream to work with. It’s quickly become my favorite shawl!




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A little lace tease

I blocked my Laminaria shawl this weekend. Oooh la la it’s pretty! The incredible yarn from Joy at The Knitting Goddess gives it an ethereal feel that’s sexy and light.
Here’s the Stats –
Laminaria designed by Elizabeth Freeman
Knitty – Spring 2008

Size 4 lace circ needle
Alpaca/cashmere lace yarn from The Knitting Goddess
Cast On Jan 27
Bind off March 10
Difficulty Level – brutal but addictive

More photos this week.


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Laminaria update

It’s really tough to knit intricate lace when your mouth hurts.
It’s really tough to knit intricate lace when your head hurts.
It’s really tough to knit intricate lace at any given moment.

Dang.

The Laminaria has kicked my butt time and again during the last few weeks. Usually I’m really good at counting. I even have a history of bookkeeping for goodness sake. But with nearly five hundred stitches now on the needle I’m tinking as much as I’m knitting.

It’s humbling.

I was flying pretty high early in this project – feeling confident and cocky. Not a single oops during the start chart. I love the nupps (pronounced to rhyme with soups according to the interview I heard with Nancy Bush on the Knit Picks podcast), just love them. For some reason though the simple repeats of knittwotogethers and slipslipknits, combined with yarnovers and knits are more than I can handle lately.

Last night I finished off the the first edging chart and began the second edging chart. AKA the LAST CHART. Yes, for those of you wondering I did put in a lifeline. Hah! Thought you’d caught me didn’t you?

It’s a nice friday night and we’re driving to Owasso for some really good pizza, then I’m coming home to the Lam. To work on the Lam. To tink on the Lam. ::sigh:: The first row of the final chart needs tinking. But only the second half of the row, which means I’m making progress. Don’t you agree?

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TWO OTN

Here are a few close up views of the current projects On The Needles.
First is the Laminaria, which I’m knitting as a KAL for http://seasonsoflace.com/. The yarn is incredible, it’s a cashmere and alpaca blend of lace from The Knitting Goddess.


Second is the Rivolo Scarf from Anne Hanson. I’m using some Malabrigo Lace that I bought in Taos.

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Life Lesson of the Day

Laminaria
5th repeat of Blossom Chart, Row 7

S2KP

It takes four times as long to tink back (for the non-knitters – AKA unknitting) and correct an error than it does to knit it right the first time.

It’s worse when you have to do it twice, in one row.

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