Carols and Crumpets!

For over twenty years people have been marking their calendar each year for the Tulsa Herb Society’s Carols & Crumpets. This Saturday from 8am to 3pm this popular holiday shopping event will be held at the Tulsa Garden Center located at 24th and Peoria in Midtown Tulsa.

Lost City Knits will be there along with many of our Cherry Street Farmers Market friends like 3P’s in a Pod, Utopia Gardens, Spice Market and more. Most of the vendors at this event are local and you’re sure to see several things that will help you check off gifts on that long list you’re carrying around these days. You might even find something special for yourself. (It’s okay – I won’t tell.)

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Our vacation and the cold weather has inspired me to dye up some new colorways and I’m really excited about what the dyepot has yielded in the past week. I hope you will be too.

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See you there!
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I’ve just got to say – it’s nearly impossible to photograph bright orange yarn. Fvar gaJsHost = ((“https:” == document.location.protocol) ? “https://ssl.” : “http://www.”);document.write(unescape(“%3Cscript src='” + gaJsHost + “google-analytics.com/ga.js’ type=’text/javascript’%3E%3C/script%3E”)); var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker(“UA-xxxxxx-x”);pageTracker._trackPageview();
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A Special Holiday Yarn Offer

As a special thank you to Lost City Knits online customers, we’ll be including a copy of the Generations Scarf/Stole pattern with each order placed through the end of 2010.

Whether you’re stash enhancing or giving the gift of creativity through knitting to a friend or family member (or hinting to your loved one that you’d really like yarn for Christmas, Chanukka, or Solstice) we’d love to help make it special.

This pattern is written for two sizes, a scarf knit using 400yds of lace weight or a stole knit using 900yds.

Happy Knitting Everyone!

Desert Southwest Vacation – Part Two

Desert Southwest Vacation Part Two

Taos and Santa Fe, New Mexico

Leaving the beautiful parks of Utah and making our way toward Taos on Utah Hwy 261 we took one of the most hair raising roads of the trip and probably my life (rivaled only by those skinny winding cliffside roads in Ireland). Sure there was warning sign that trucks need to detour, and then a sign that said a gravel road was ahead. That didn’t pause us, heck we live on a dirt and gravel road. But this road was different. The narrow gravel road twisted and switchbacked all the way down a mountain side. Chris was in his element and loving every moment. I was gripping the door handle and trying not to panic as I waited for the Meclizine to kick in. We met no other vehicles on this section, which was fortunate because one of us would have had to back up to one of the few (very few) places where a should had been created just wide enough for a tiny car to perch as another passed. It gives me the shudders to think about it now.

As we dropped off the mountain road onto the desert floor I was flooded with relief and there were several miles of weird laughing as we talked and drove along a now flat highway. Our next goal was to make it to Monument Valley before sunset. If you’ve seen many old school westerns you’ve seen glimpses of Monument Valley. We didn’t stop for photos but we did pass a movie being filmed.

This is Navajo land, barren and wide open. After dinner at a local diner in Kayenta, we filled the Volkswagen up with diesel and decided to drive on through the dark to find a hotel. Seventeen miles east of Kayenta on Hwy 417 a school bus we’d been following stopped. A tall lean young man stepped out and crossed the road. In our headlights we could see him cross through a gate and walk into a pitch black night. There were no house lights in the distance. The temperature was near freezing. I felt chilled inside my nice car with seatwarmers as I thought of the young man wallking….

The Leonids meteor shower was supposed to begin that night and as we drove on toward a hotel in Cortez we watched the blue black sky. We saw a few meteors dart through the sky and disappear quickly.

The next day as we drove through Carson National Park nearing Taos we had to slow down to navigate a road block – of sheep and goats. These photos were taken as I leaned out the window all the while being watched by the guardian of the flock.
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Our Taos B&B was the Stewart House. It’s an utterly charming little place with all the amenities and loads of Taos charisma. The owner is soft-spoken and non-intrusive. She makes a mighty fine pancake breakfast too!

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Taos is one of my favorite places and a great stop if you like to park your car and then walk the streets stopping in shops. One of the best meals of our trip was hot soup from a street vendor. This young man will not be noted on your restaurant guide or in your Lonely Planet book. He’s a fabulous chef who uses local organic ingredients. I had the tomato bisque with peanuts, topped with sesame and cilantro. Not only was my body warm inside but my taste buds were thrilled and satisfied. Chris had a noodle dish which was wonderful. I wanted to go back and order duck chili but knew I couldn’t eat another bite.

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One of the planned stops was Weaving Southwest.This is now my favorite yarn shop in Taos. (For those of you who haven’t been there in a while Taos Sunflower has closed.) There are huge looms being used by a local weaver, and long walls of hand dyed yarns organized by color. It made me giddy. I’ve been in a lot of yarn shops but this place is spectacular with color! Weaving Southwest is also the home of the Rio Grande Spinning Wheel. The owner/founder’s granddaughter gave us a demo on the big spinning wheel. It’s dramatically different than most of the modern spinning wheels that I’ve seen. Chris and I each took a whirl at the peddles and spindle. I had an ah-ha moment as everything that I’ve tried on a drop spindle suddenly worked. Drafting was a breeze on this wheel. And get this – I spun lace weight! RIght there after a few minutes time – lace weight! Go figure.

Later on Paseo du Pueblo I spotted an overgrown park. Or was it? I walked through the vacant lot which has become an unofficial little sanctuary. Here are a few photos.

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If you’re going to Taos be sure to drive up to Arroyo Seco. It’s small and quaint and a place I think I could live. Have some ice cream at the Taos Cow or a Negro Modello at Abe’s Bar. You can’t go wrong in Seco. Slow down to the local’s pace and enjoy the peacefulness.

Santa Fe is about museums, galleries and shopping. Because I can’t learn enough about Georgia O’Keeffe the O’Keeffe Museum was one of our first stops. I am constantly intrigued by O’Keeffe’s paintings and by the photographs of her. Her years in New Mexico especially, dragging home bones – walking in the wild openness – hours spent just watching the colors in her surroundings….

The Folk Museum in Santa Fe is another great stop. Whether you’re interested in fiber arts, silver smithing, painting or poppets the exhibits in this museum will make you happy. There is a lot to see and the exhibits change regularly so I recommend going every time you get an opportunity.

Travel – wherever you go – whyever you go – can be inspiring and enlightening. It can cause you to look at your life or the world around you in a new way.

I journal on a regular basis and daily while traveling, but before we left Santa Fe we sat down in the coffee shop of a local bookstore and poured onto paper our thoughts, dreams, and plans for the future. Notes made separate from our journals – notes to pin up and remind us of what we want so we don’t lose that focus as we return to our daily lives here on the farm.
Desert Southwest Vacation Part TwoTaos and Santa Fe, New MexicoLeaving the beautiful parks of Utah and making our way toward Taos on Utah Hwy 261 we took one of the most hair raising roads of the trip and probably my life (rivaled only by those skinny winding cliffside roads in Ireland). Sure there was warning sign that trucks need to detour, and then a sign that said a gravel road was ahead. That didn’t pause us, heck we live on a dirt and gravel road. But this road was different. The narrow gravel road twisted and switchbacked all the way down a mountain side. Chris was in his element and loving every moment. I was gripping the door handle and trying not to panic as I waited for the Meclizine to kick in. We met no other vehicles on this section, which was fortunate because one of us would have had to back up to one of the few (very few) places where a should had been created just wide enough for a tiny car to perch as another passed. It gives me the shudders to think about it now. As we dropped off the mountain road onto the desert floor I was flooded with relief and there were several miles of weird laughing as we talked and drove along a now flat highway. Our next goal was to make it to Monument Valley before sunset. If you’ve seen many old school westerns you’ve seen glimpses of Monument Valley. We didn’t stop for photos but we did pass a movie being filmed. This is Navajo land, barren and wide open. After dinner at a local diner in Kayenta, we filled the Volkswagen up with diesel and decided to drive on through the dark to find a hotel. Seventeen miles east of Kayenta on Hwy 417 a school bus we’d been following stopped. A tall lean young man stepped out and crossed the road. In our headlights we could see him cross through a gate and walk into a pitch black night. There were no house lights in the distance. The temperature was near freezing. I felt chilled inside my nice car with seatwarmers as I thought of the young man wallking….The Leonids meteor shower was supposed to begin that night and as we drove on toward a hotel in Cortez we watched the blue black sky. We saw a few meteors dart through the sky and disappear quickly. The next day as we drove through Carson National Park nearing Taos we had to slow down to navigate a road block – of sheep and goats. These photos were taken as I leaned out the window all the while being watched by the guardian of the flock. Our Taos B&B was the Stewart House. It’s an utterly charming little place with all the amenities and loads of Taos charisma. The owner is soft-spoken and non-intrusive. She makes a mighty fine pancake breakfast too! Taos is one of my favorite places and a great stop if you like to park your car and then walk the streets stopping in shops. One of the best meals of our trip was hot soup from a street vendor. This young man will not be noted on your restaurant guide or in your Lonely Planet book. He’s a fabulous chef who uses local organic ingredients. I had the tomato bisque with peanuts, topped with sesame and cilantro. Not only was my body warm inside but my taste buds were thrilled and satisfied. Chris had a noodle dish which was wonderful. I wanted to go back and order duck chili but knew I couldn’t eat another bite. One of the planned stops was Weaving Southwest.This is now my favorite yarn shop in Taos. (For those of you who haven’t been there in a while Taos Sunflower has closed.) There are huge looms being used by a local weaver, and long walls of hand dyed yarns organized by color. It made me giddy. I’ve been in a lot of yarn shops but this place is spectacular with color! Weaving Southwest is also the home of the Rio Grande Spinning Wheel. The owner/founder’s granddaughter gave us a demo on the big spinning wheel. It’s dramatically different than most of the modern spinning wheels that I’ve seen. Chris and I each took a whirl at the peddles and spindle. I had an ah-ha moment as everything that I’ve tried on a drop spindle suddenly worked. Drafting was a breeze on this wheel. And get this – I spun lace weight! RIght there after a few minutes time – lace weight! Go figure. Later on Paseo du Pueblo I spotted an overgrown park. Or was it? I walked through the vacant lot which has become an unofficial little sanctuary. Here are a few photos. If you’re going to Taos be sure to drive up to Arroyo Seco. It’s small and quaint and a place I think I could live. Have some ice cream at the Taos Cow or a Negro Modello at Abe’s Bar. You can’t go wrong in Seco. Slow down to the local’s pace and enjoy the peacefulness. Santa Fe is about museums, galleries and shopping. Because I can’t learn enough about Georgia O’Keeffe the O’Keeffe Museum was one of our first stops. I am constantly intrigued by O’Keeffe’s paintings and by the photographs of her. Her years in New Mexico especially, dragging home bones – walking in the wild openness – hours spent just watching the colors in her surroundings….The Folk Museum in Santa Fe is another great stop. Whether you’re interested in fiber arts, silver smithing, painting or poppets the exhibits in this museum will make you happy. There is a lot to see and the exhibits change regularly so I recommend going every time you get an opportunity. Travel – wherever you go – whyever you go – can be inspiring and enlightening. It can cause you to look at your life or the world around you in a new way. I journal on a regular basis and daily while traveling, but before we left Santa Fe we sat down in the coffee shop of a local bookstore and poured onto paper our thoughts, dreams, and plans for the future. Notes made separate from our journals – notes to pin up and remind us of what we want so we don’t lose that focus as we return to our daily lives here on the farm. var gaJsHost = ((“https:” == document.location.protocol) ? “https://ssl.” : “http://www.”);document.write(unescape(“%3Cscript src='” + gaJsHost + “google-analytics.com/ga.js’ type=’text/javascript’%3E%3C/script%3E”)); var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker(“UA-xxxxxx-x”);pageTracker._trackPageview();

Trying for Perspective

The morning is glistening here on the farm as the sun shoots off the bits of ice and frost that covers limbs and grass. Numerous friends of mine are running 5K races in below freezing temperatures. Not me, once upon a time I did such things. Some are shopping and may have been for hours. Instead of doing either I’m staring out the window of the Rabbit Hole I call an office at the bird feeder that I repaired and filled with seed yesterday. The little feathered friends we share the farm with haven’t discovered it yet. Or maybe they’re wary of the foreign thing hanging from the tree. I wish I could coax them, remind them the feeder was on the same limb all last winter until it blew off in a spring storm and that the pickin’s are going to be slim now with winter approaching. It’s not just for my entertainment, or so I pretend.

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………….
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2010 Desert Southwest Vacation – Part One

Happy Thanksgiving to all of my US friends. I hope your holiday is filled with warmth and joy.

2010 Desert Southwest Vacation
Part One

Our Friday morning started with a little flurry as we rushed around putting together our Oklahoma Food Coop order to drop off at Chef Teri’s kitchen. She’d graciously agreed to hold our outgoing order and get it to the Tulsa drop off location. While we were in Tulsa we had lunch with Hillarey before embarking on our adventure. I guess it’s a parental thing but we like to have a little face time with her driving off for several weeks.

The weather was warm on the first day out on the road, but after spending the night at the Starlite Inn in Springfield, Colorado I’d decided it was time to switch from a t-shirt to a turtleneck. Yeah – I had autumn on the brain. Here’s a photo of the Starlite Inn and our new Jetta TDI. This is our second Jetta wagon, and it’s pretty much the same as the older version we had. Same great mileage as the first one. I can say that because throughout the trip Chris was keeping me informed – in case you’re curious we averaged 48 mpg on the trip.

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I’m a very lucky woman. Not every man on vacation would tell you when he saw a yarn shop sign and pull over for a quick stop without being begged. Mine did just that. Edla’s Yarn Shop in Walsenburg, Colorado is right on the main street as you drive through town. I popped into the shop and inadvertently interrupted a Saturday morning knit group. The ladies were sweet and having a good time. Edla is from the Faroe Islands and I bought a nice skein of Sirritag wool lace yarn to make a Faroese shawl sometime in 2011. Maybe something like Edla was wearing?

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By the time we’d reached Arches National Park in Utah on Sunday the weather was cold and crisp. We set up camp and made a run into Moab for groceries, then attended the final Park Ranger program of the season. Freezing rain pelted the tent sometime during the night, but we stayed dry and reasonably warm in our sleeping bags. Reasonably warm means none of my toes fell off during the night! I slept in socks, a stocking cap, a turtleneck, wool tights and still shivered. After a nice campfire breakfast the next morning we headed out for a day of hiking. The trick to hiking in cold weather is layers and I quickly warmed up enough to remove an outer layer. I’ve got to say, a triangle shawl is just right for hiking. Your back stays warm with a daypack against it and your front is kept cozy when you wrap the shawl to where the big part of the triangle hangs in front.

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My easy point-and-shoot camera took some great photos. I find the warm oranges and browns of the arches and rock walls incredibly striking and awe inspiring. The bareness of the sage, cactus and blackthorn bushes along with the twisting tree trunks create a sparse beauty that just makes me incredibly happy. Several times between trails we made it back to camp just as another quick shower of freezing rain occurred. Within minutes the storm would pass and the sun would come out again – then off we’d go on another hike.

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On Monday night we went to the Moab Brewery to meet up with Colleen, one of my Ravelry friends from Utah. Why I didn’t think to pull out my camera for a quick photo I don’t know. Maybe because the conversation was too good?

Hiking at Canyonlands is just as gorgeous but the terrain is slightly different from Arches. There was more climbing involved and the deep canyons made me feel like the smallest spec of unimportant matter in this vast universe. Often we humans think we are so big and vital, that we are ruling the cosmos. A day spent in Canyonlands can cure that notion, especially if you (or someone you love) walks out on a natural archway suspended over – well nothingness for miles! Chris is fearless. Me, I stayed on firm ground except for one brief moment three feet from the edge of this arch.

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Coming in a few days –
Part Two of 2010 Desert Southwest Vacation – Taos and Santa Fe.

Now…back to the chair by the fire and the sweater I’m knitting.
Happy Thanksgiving to all of my US blog friends. I hope your holiday is filled with warmth and joy.2010 Desert Southwest VacationPart OneOur Friday morning started with a little flurry as we rushed around putting together our Oklahoma Food Coop order to drop off at Chef Teri’s kitchen. She’d graciously agreed to hold our outgoing order and get it to the Tulsa drop off location. While we were in Tulsa we had lunch with Hillarey before embarking on our adventure. I guess it’s a parental thing but we like to have a little face time with her driving off for weeks. The weather was warm on the first day out on the road, but after spending the night at the Starlite Inn in Springfield, Colorado I’d decided it was time to switch from a t-shirt to a turtleneck. Yeah – I had autumn on the brain. Here’s a photo of the Starlite Inn and our new Jetta TDI. This is our second Jetta wagon, and it’s pretty much the same as the older version we had. Same great mileage as the first one. I can say that because throughout the trip Chris was keeping me informed – in case you’re curious we averaged 48 mpg on the trip. I’m a very lucky woman. Not every man on vacation would tell you when he saw a yarn shop sign and pull over for a quick stop without being begged. Mine did just that. Edla’s Yarn Shop in Walsenburg, Colorado is right on the main street as you drive through town. I popped into the shop and interrupted a Saturday morning knit group. The ladies were sweet and having a good time. Edla is from the Faroe Islands and I bought a nice skein of Sirritag wool lace yarn to make a Faroese shawl sometime in 2011. By the time we’d reached Arches National Park in Utah on Sunday the weather was cold and crisp. We set up camp and made a run into Moab for groceries, then attended the final Park Ranger program of the season. Freezing rain pelted the tent sometime during the night, but we stayed dry and reasonably warm in our sleeping bags. Reasonably warm means none of my toes fell off during the night. I slept in socks, a stocking cap, a turtleneck, wool tights and still shivered. After a nice campfire breakfast we headed out for a day of hiking. The trick to hiking in cold weather is layers and I quickly warmed up enough to remove an outer layer. But I’ve got to say, a triangle shawl is just right for hiking. Your back stays warm with a daypack against it and your front is kept cozy when you wrap the shawl to where the big part of the triangle hangs in front.My easy point-and-shoot camera took some great photos. I find the warm oranges and browns of the arches and rock walls incredibly striking and awe inspiring. The bareness of the sage, cactus and blackthorn bushes along with the twisting tree trunks create a sparse beauty that just makes me incredibly happy. Several times between trails we made it back to camp just as another quick shower of freezing rain occurred. Within minutes the storm would pass and the sun would come out again – then off we’d go on another hike. On Monday night we went to the Moab Brewery to meet up with Colleen, one of my Ravelry friends from Utah. Why I didn’t think to pull out my camera for a quick photo I don’t know. Maybe because the conversation was too good? Hiking at Canyonlands is just as gorgeous but the terrain is slightly different. There was more climbing involved and the deep canyons made me feel like the smallest spec of unimportant matter in this vast universe. Often we humans think we are so big and important, that we are ruling the cosmos. A day spent in Canyonlands can cure that notion, especially if you (or someone you love) walks out on a natural archway suspended over – well nothingness for miles! Chris is fearless. Me, I stayed firm ground except for one brief moment three feet from the edge of this arch. Coming in a few days – Part Two of 2010 Desert Southwest Vacation – Taos and Santa Fe. Now…back to the chair by the fire and the sweater I’m knitting. var gaJsHost = ((“https:” == document.location.protocol) ? “https://ssl.” : “http://www.”);document.write(unescape(“%3Cscript src='” + gaJsHost + “google-analytics.com/ga.js’ type=’text/javascript’%3E%3C/script%3E”)); var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker(“UA-xxxxxx-x”);pageTracker._trackPageview();

Home and the travel mojo

It feels so good to be back home!

Vacation in the Desert Southwest was wonderful in so many ways – good food, nice people and incredible natural sights. Just what you want from a get away, right? There was even time to knit in the car. In fact, I almost finished my Daenerys Shawl on the trip. Only one row and the bind off remained when we pulled into the lane of our farm yesterday.

Dragon Goddess on the road
Daenerys Shawl – somewhere in Colorado last week

I’ll share a few vacation photos here on the blog in the next few days. As always the Southwest inspires me and I’m already soaking yarn to get a little bit of dyeing done today. Tomorrow is Thanksgiving here in the US but I intend to be back in the studio on Friday to embrace the travel inspired mojo and create some great new colorways. 

This morning at breakfast I played catch up with my Yarn Harlot page-a-day calendar. Tomorrow is Thanksgiving in the US and I think the Harlot has some great advice for family gatherings….

“I have learned not to mention knitting at parties full of regular people. Even though some people collect spoons or stamps, others go to sci-fi conventions, and still more sit watching other chase balls around on TV, it turns out that society has not yet advanced far enough for people to believe that converting string to clothing using only sticks could be even a little bit interesting.”

Stephanie Pearl McPhee
Yarn Harlot Page-a-day 2010
22 November 2010


Thanks Harlot for that sage advice. 




…………..

Vacation and bears

As of Friday 12 November I’ll be on vacation meandering and hiking around Utah and New Mexico where no doubt I will find inspiration for new colorways – or maybe just get lost in the beauty of the desert Southwest. It’s happened before.

According to my father I’ve been to Arches National Park before, but since I was an infant I don’t think it really counts. Today my father told me a story about our stopping there on a cross country trip in 1959 and finding a mother bear in the park bathroom. I’m halfway sure the bears are hibernating now. You think he was trying to scare me or make me laugh? I’ve decided it’s cold and the bears are hibernating now. Yes – I’m certain – the bears are hibernating. Uh huh.

If you’re ordering yarn it will be mailed when we return to the farm sometime around Thanksgiving.

Happy Autumnal Knitting Everyone!

As of Friday 12 November I’ll be on vacation meandering and hiking around Utah and New Mexico where no doubt I will find inspiration for new colorways – or maybe just get lost in the beauty of the desert Southwest. It’s happened before. According to my father I’ve been to Arches National Park before, but since I was an infant I don’t think it really counts. Today my father told me a story about our stopping there on a cross country trip in 1959 and finding a mother bear in the park bathroom. I’m halfway sure the bears are hibernating now. You think he was trying to scare me or make me laugh? I’ve decided it’s cold and the bears are hibernating now. Yes – I’m certain – the bears are hibernating. Uh huh. If you’re ordering yarn it will be mailed when we return to the farm sometime around Thanksgiving. var gaJsHost = ((“https:” == document.location.protocol) ? “https://ssl.” : “http://www.”);document.write(unescape(“%3Cscript src='” + gaJsHost + “google-analytics.com/ga.js’ type=’text/javascript’%3E%3C/script%3E”)); var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker(“UA-xxxxxx-x”);pageTracker._trackPageview();