Thinking Fall.

Summer in Oklahoma can be brutal. The heat and the humidity are taking the toll on many of our farmer friends. While our field has already been harvested, Chris is working each morning (while the temps are slightly lower) to maintain or reclaim parts of the field, in the afternoon he’s been tackling paperwork or joining me in the studio. I’ve been making crazy in the studio with countless batches of soap for the fall festival season. Well, not countless really. I’ve got calendars and spreadhsheets and quickbooks to help me forecast and plan how many batches of soap per event that we’ll be attending. Soap takes four to six weeks to cure so I work backwards on the calendar to see by what date each events soap needs to be made.

Part of the way I deal with the Oklahoma heat is to try and get my mind into Fall. My friend Steve over at Pork & Greens swears that fall is in the air. The man thinks he can feel and hear it in the wind. You know farmers spend so much time outside that they have this extra instinct. Right? I thought the same thing last weekend when I saw the first yellow leaves float on a breeze. Maybe Steve’s right.

Today my Emily Dickinson shawl will move to the last chart, which has beads. It’s coming along nicely and I like the progress to shorter rows. Usually those long rows at the end of a shawl make me groan, but I can already feel the rows speeding up on Emily. But beading means that Emily will become couch knitting and no longer a travel project.

It’s not quite August (also referred to as Hell in Oklahoma) but in my attempt to avoid thinking about insane heat my thoughts are leaning towards Fall knitting so while I was contemplating a new project to work on in the car, I mentally listed some of the works-in-progress. Then I looked at the ones that jumped first into my mind (because all knitters know there are WIP’s that need to stew and brew and some just get ignored).

There’s the Nonpareil Cardigan. I love the pattern and love the yarn. I’ve got half of the back piece finished. I’d really like to have this one done in time to wear this fall – but it sits in a bag hanging from a chair in my office aka The Rabbit Hole. It’s a possibility for  a travel project.

Last year at this time I cast on the Rogue Hoodie. I love the pattern and the color of the yarn but am uncertain about the quality of the yarn I’m using. I think there is an error somewhere in my cabling too so it needs to be frogged. Not travel ready.

There’s also the Icarus Shawl. I have not done right by the Icarus. I’m halfway through the final chart and can’t seem to pick it up and finish it. Shame on me. It holds possibility.

So what’s a knitter to do? Last night we made a mad dash into Tulsa to trade cars with my daughter.  She’s going camping in Colorado and our Jeep seemed a better vehicle than her little Golf. So for car knitting I grabbed a ball of previously wound sock yarn. (a knitter always needs to have some yarn wound on hand for emergencies, don’t you know) and a copy of the Nutkin pattern, needles and a sock sack. I began casting on as soon as we got off the dirt road onto the blacktop. Socks are a necessity in the fall, and the colorway just sets you in the mood for crisp breezes, a roaring fire, maybe a hike along a path with scattered leaves of gold, green, brown and red. Yarn – Tempted Good Grrl in colorway Saucy.

Summer in Oklahoma can be brutal. The heat and the humidity are taking the toll on many of our farmer friends. While our field has already been harvested, Chris is working each morning to maintain or reclaim parts of the field. I’ve been making crazy in the studio, with countless batches of soap for the fall festival season. Well, not countless really. I’ve got calendars and spreadhsheets and quickbooks to help me forecast and plan how many batches of soap per event that we’ll be attending. Soap takes four to six weeks to cure so I work backwards on the calendar to see by what date each events soap needs to be made. Part of the way I deal with the Oklahoma heat is to try and get my mind into fall. My friend Steve over at Pork N Greens swears he smells fall coming. The man thinks he can feel and hear it in the wind. You know farmers spend so much time outside that they have this extra instinct. Right? I thought the same thing last weekend when I saw the first yellow leaves float on a breeze. Maybe Steve’s right. Today my Emily Dickinson shawl will move to the last chart, which has beads. It’s coming along nicely and I like the progress to shorter rows. Usually those long rows at the end of a shawl make me groan, but I can already feel the rows speeding up on Emily. But beading means that Emily will become couch knitting and no longer a travel project. It’s not quite August (also referred to as Hell in Oklahoma) but my thoughts are leaning towards fall knitting so while I was contemplating a new project to work on in the car, I mentally catalogued the works-in-progress. There’s the Nonpareil Cardigan. I love the pattern and love the yarn, but I am no where near getting the correct gauge with the size needle that is recommended. I’ve got half of the back piece finished. I’d really like to have this one done in time to wear this fall – but it sits in a bag hanging from a chair in my office aka The Rabbit Hole. It’s a possibility for  a travel project. Last year at this time I cast on the Rogue Hoodie. I love the pattern and the color of the yarn but am uncertain about the quality of the yarn I’m using. I think there is an error somewhere in my cabling too so it needs to be frogged. Not travel ready. There’s also the Icarus Shawl. I have not done right by the Icarus. I’m halfway through the finak chart and can’t seem to pick it up and finish it. Shame on me. So what’s a knitter to do? Last night we made a mad dash into Tulsa to trade cars with my daughter.  She’s going camping in Colorado and our Jeep seemed a better vehicle than her little Golf. So for car knitting I grabbed a ball of previously wound sock yarn. (a knitter always needs to have some yarn wound on hand for emergencies don’t you know) and a copy of the Nutkin pattern, needles and a sock sack. I began casting on as soon as we got to the blacktop. Socks are a necessity in the fall. Yarn – Tempted Good Grrl in colorway Saucy. var gaJsHost = ((“https:” == document.location.protocol) ? “https://ssl.” : “http://www.”);document.write(unescape(“%3Cscript src='” + gaJsHost + “google-analytics.com/ga.js’ type=’text/javascript’%3E%3C/script%3E”)); var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker(“UA-xxxxxx-x”);pageTracker._trackPageview();

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4 thoughts on “Thinking Fall.

  1. I'd like to think that your “Saucy” sock project will work like sympathetic magick and urge autumn onwards towards us sooner than usual! The colorway makes my heart sigh for fallingleaves and a cool, smokey breeze from the North.

    Poor Steve – pity Oklahoma has such a short fall before it heads into winter. That Georgia farm boy feels the icy bite of winter pretty keenly. By the way, I named the stout mustard after him and found a clip art guy that looks a lot like him for the label. Still want to tweak that recipe just a little.

  2. I always try to have a pair of socks on the needles. They are the perfect travel knitting, they can come with me anywhere: at work, in the car, to class, watching the husband train the dogs.

    If I don't have a pair of socks to knit, I feel out of balance. And since I give most of them away, it makes other people happy as well.

    cgirlslife- who's compy is being mean and won't post properly

  3. LOVE the Saucy yarn! I hope Steve is right and that it spreads to Ohio soon. Both June and July have been Hell here this year.

    I'm trying to decide on yarn for Icarus. Have just bought the THIRD skein of yarn that I swear will be perfect for Summer In the Foothills…wonder which one will win out?? 🙂

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