One down, one to go…

The best way to end a tumultuous day? Finish a wildly striped sock.
The yarn – STR Tide Pooling in light weight
The pattern – my own basic toe up pattern


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The Saga Continues

The Mailbox Miscreants were back this weekend. Two new mailboxes for the farm are needed.

Did you know there’s a device that you can attach to your mailbox that releases skunk oil when it’s bashed?

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Nap dream

Mid- afternoon I crawled on the bed for a nap. I didn’t really think I’d sleep but the idea felt good to me.

I did sleep, and dream.

The only dream I recall was being in an elevator. It was made of light cream colored marble. To change floors you had to slide a rectangle of marble up or down next to the floor number on the wall beside the doors. My elevator wouldn’t move though – up or down – and the door wouldn’t open. I was mildly frustrated, not upset or angry, and kept tinkering away with it knowing it’d open sooner or later.

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TWO OTN

Here are a few close up views of the current projects On The Needles.
First is the Laminaria, which I’m knitting as a KAL for http://seasonsoflace.com/. The yarn is incredible, it’s a cashmere and alpaca blend of lace from The Knitting Goddess.


Second is the Rivolo Scarf from Anne Hanson. I’m using some Malabrigo Lace that I bought in Taos.

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The Big Read

Jung-at-Heart had this list on her blog. I thought I’d give it a whirl.

“The Big Read answers a big need. Reading at Risk: A Survey of Literary Reading in America, a 2004 report by the National Endowment for the Arts, found that not only is literary reading in America declining rapidly among all groups, but that the rate of decline has accelerated, especially among the young. The concerned citizen in search of good news about American literary culture would study the pages of this report in vain.
They say the average American has only read 6 of the following:”
Key
1) Bold the books you have already read
2) Italicize the books you intend to read
3) Notes in parentheses next to note-worthy titles.

1) Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
2) The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien
3) Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
4) Harry Potter series by J. K. Rowling (the first book)
5) To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
6) The Bible
7) Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte (I tried to read it again recently and just can’t)
8 ) Nineteen Eighty Four by George Orwell
9) His Dark Materials by Philip Pullman
10) Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
11) Little Women by Louisa May Alcott (the first book I fell in love with)
12) Tess of the D’Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
13) Catch 22 by Joseph Heller
14) Complete Works of Shakespeare (some)
15) Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier
16) The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien
17) Birdsong by Sebastian Faulks
18 ) Catcher in the Rye by JD Salinger
19) The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
20) Middlemarch by George Eliot (about 50 pages to go –I know I’ll reread this!)
21) Gone With The Wind by Margaret Mitchell
22) The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
23) Bleak House by Charles Dickens
24) War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
25) The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams
26) Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
27) Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
28 ) Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
29) Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
30) The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
31) Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
32) David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
33) Chronicles of Narnia by CS Lewis
34) Emma by Jane Austen
35) Persuasion by Jane Austen
36) The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe by CS Lewis
37) The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
38 ) Captain Corelli’s Mandolin by Louis De Bernieres
39) Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden
40) Winnie the Pooh by AA Milne
41) Animal Farm by George Orwell
42) The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown
43) One Hundred Years of Solitude, Gabriel Garcia Marquez (maybe halfway)
44) A Prayer for Owen Meaney by John Irving
45) The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins
46) Anne of Green Gables by LM Montgomery
47) Far From The Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy
48 ) The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
49) Lord of the Flies by William Golding
50) Atonement by Ian McEwan
51) Life of Pi by Yann Martel
52) Dune by Frank Herbert
53) Cold Comfort Farm by Stella Gibbons
54) Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
55) A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth
56) The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon
57) A Tale Of Two Cities by Charles Dickens (started but didn’t finish)
58 ) Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
59) The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon
60) Love In The Time Of Cholera by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
61) Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
62) Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
63) The Secret History by Donna Tartt
64) The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold
65) Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
66) On The Road by Jack Kerouac
67) Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy
68 ) Bridget Jones’s Diary by Helen Fielding
69) Midnight’s Children by Salman Rushdie
70) Moby Dick by Herman Melville
71) Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
72) Dracula by Bram Stoker
73) The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
74) Notes From A Small Island by Bill Bryson
75) Ulysses by James Joyce
76) The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
77) Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome
78 ) Germinal by Emile Zola
79) Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray
80) Possession by AS Byatt
81) A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
82) Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell
83) The Color Purple by Alice Walker
84) The Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro
85) Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
86) A Fine Balance by Rohinton Mistry
87) Charlotte’s Web by EB White
88 ) The Five People You Meet In Heaven by Mitch Albom
89) Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
90) The Faraway Tree Collection by Enid Blyton
91) Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
92) The Little Prince by Antoine De Saint-Exupery
93) The Wasp Factory by Iain Banks
94) Watership Down by Richard Adams
95) A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole
96) A Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute
97) The Three Musketeers – Alexandre Dumas
98 ) Hamlet by William Shakespeare
99) Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
100) Les Miserables by Victor Hugo

Well, not as good as I’d thought, but some titles to consider when I’m reaching for a new book to read.
I checked the National Endowment for the Arts and below is their current list.

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton
Bless Me, Ultima by Rudolfo Anaya
The Bridge of San Luis Rey and Our Town by Thornton Wilder
The Call of the Wild by Jack London
The Death of Ivan Ilyich by Leo Tolstoy
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
Housekeeping by Marilynne Robinson
The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan
A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest J. Gaines
Love Medicine by Louise Erdrich
The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett
My Ántonia by Willa Cather
Old School by Tobias Wolff
The Poetry of Emily Dickinson by Emily Dickinson
The Poetry of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

The Poetry of Robinson Jeffers by Robinson Jeffers
The Shawl by Cynthia Ozick
The Stories and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe by Edgar Allan Poe
Sun, Stone, and Shadows by Jorge F. Hernández (editor)
Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
The Thief and the Dogs by Naguib Mahfouz
The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien (I tried this and it was just too horrific)
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
Washington Square by Henry James
A Wizard of Earthsea by Ursula K.

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Miscreants

We’re near the end of building a house and got an “official” address a few weeks ago so we put up a new mailbox beside the current farmhouse mailbox. I had a goofy little tingly joy when we put it up. Chris stenciled the address in a nice green. New house – new mailbox – gotta feel good right? Then last week we replaced the farmhouse mailbox because it had taken a few batterings from random baseball bats over the years and the door no longer opened all the way. The mail carrier left us a really sweet thank you. Well – it’s a USPS notice but was signed in blue ink by a real person.

This afternoon Paul, Chris’s dad, called to tell us that both of our new mailboxes had been beaten to a pulp this weekend. Ours was in pieces. The posts were completely out of the ground and a beer bottle lay beside them.

When we installed the new box I had the poor humor to laugh and say that it should last until Spring Break. It’s not so funny now.

I just don’t get this type of “fun”. If you read my 25 Random Facts – just refer to #2.

I guess Tuesday we’ll find out what might have been lost, if anything. There were two things I was expecting. My Anniversary Issue of Wild Fibers…

Miscreants.

…and my new Debit Card from the bank..

Miscreants.

Fortunately I had been saving a bar of Dagoba New Moon dark chocolate that Hillarey had slipped in my Giftmas stocking. Two pieces of that have taken off the edge.

little jerks.

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