Erasing existence ….

Our condo is going up for sale. In fact, the realtor is taking photos right now downstairs.

The worst thing is making the house look like no one really lives here. Dust bunnies gone. Dust gone. Desks cleared. Pillows fluffed.

Now that all sounds really easy to live with right? What it really means is that all of my medicines are stowed away with my panties so I’ll see them everyday (or at least on weekends). My reading glasses are in my desk drawer where I’ll never see them again. Only the good hand loomed dishtowels are out. I can’t leave the glass of water beside the bed. Any books that might embarrass a potential buyer (or to keep me from looking like a social deviant) are turned spine-side in on the bookshelf. My ball winder and swift are stashed in the closet – with the stash. My circular needles are thrust under the skeins of llama yarn in the yarn basket by the downstairs bookshelf.

I remember reading somewhere that moving is one of the most stressful episodes in life. Great wooly gods!

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Fini!

Brooks Cable Scarf
9.5 inches by 102 inches
900 yards fingering weight llama
Size 5 circular needle
Time spent – approximately 41 hours before blocking (over 4 weeks), 1 hour blocking.

The scarf for Dr Brooks is finally complete. The doctor is a tall man, well over six feet, and needs a long scarf.

Me? I’m short, really short. Photographers often add something to the photo to give the viewer something to compare size. So when I sweet-talked my sweetie into photographing the Brooks scarf on the wires I thought adding something short might help show how dad-gum long this scarf really is.

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How local is local?

Knitters talk about their LYS (local yarn shop) and foodies talk about eating local (food from farmers markets and grown locally (although I hope you don’t include Local Table, but do include Elote if you’re visiting Tulsa restaurants)). But how close in miles must it be to be considered local?

Yesterday I drove from Tulsa to Guthrie to take a class at my LYS. SWAK is not the closest yarn shop to our Tulsa condo, there’s one about a mile away. The nearby yarn shop just doesn’t give me that comfortable feeling that I get from SWAK. From what I have experienced, SWAK is not about being about being cool or shopping elitism, it’s about knitters, knitting – the art and the technique. It’s a place where you can walk in and people are interested in what you’re knitting or what the people in the class at the big tables in the rear are knitting. It’s a place you can call on the phone and ask about an obscure tool like a cro-needle and the owner says “hold on, let me pull that for you. I can hold it since you’ll be in on Saturday, right?” It’s a place where even a fairly experienced knitter will learn two new tricks in the first thirty minutes of a class with Sherry. Looking at the wonderful finished projects on display can’t help but inspire a knitter.

Soon we’ll be living full time at the farm, sixty miles east of Tulsa. Another hour and ten minutes added to my drive to visit my LYS. Worth every minute.

So Readers – how far do you drive to your LYS? Is it the closest yarn shop to your home/work?

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Stamina and Stealth

I did not, repeat did not cast on the Rivendell sock. It took stamina.

Well, not a lot of stamina because I did, however, knit up a simple garter stitch scarf with the yummy Wensleydale yarn that I bought in Taos last year. It’s spun like dreadlocks and anything intricate or clever would just be lost in the luscious crimp and natural coloring of the wool. So garter stitch and long fringe was the perfect answer! I love this scarf. It’s my new go-to scarf. It’s funky and fun and looks like I’m wearing the sheep draped around my neck. Gotta love that!

Here’s are a couple of quick pics-

Update on the house. All of the outdoor work is complete except the exterior painting, which will be a gray/green color that will blend well with the woods.

The front door was installed last week, as well as the front porch. When we left the farm earlier today I could hear the pounding of the drywallers as they began their work inside. It’s becoming very much a house. I know that sounds odd but it’s no longer a shell, there is insulation, and walls are going in. The insulation changed the interior drastically. It’s silent in there (when there is no hammering). And the walls have inched inward a bit.

Here are a few photos –





Tomorrow I’m driving to Guthrie. It’s all Cathy’s fault. She convinced me to enroll in a class. I can’t tell what the class is for because who knows – the recipient of the project may read this blog, although I highly doubt it. It’s stealth knitting!!

………………………….

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